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Killed by Deputies: In Remembrance of Ricardo and Eduardo

“My husband had dreams and aspirations and thanks to a sheriff they were cut away.”
– Mrs. Lara, wife of slain husband Ricardo Lara

Eduardo Bermudas and Ricardo Lara are numbers 598 & 599 of people killed by law enforcement in LA since 2000. That's 1 killing a week, 40% of whom are Latino.

Eduardo Bermudas and Ricardo Lara are numbers 598 & 599 of people killed by law enforcement in LA since 2000. That’s 1 killing a week, 40% of whom are Latino.

Many came from the community of East LA: family members, friends, co workers, neighbors, each holding a candle in remembrance of Ricardo and Eduardo, two men slain a couple sundays ago by Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputies. As the speakers were laying out the incident on what exactly happened, I was appalled, then disgusted, then outright furious that two friends standing in the driveway would be accosted by deputies because they couldn’t tell a real gun from a BB gun. Sister of Eduardo ran over to the deputies pleading with them not to fire at her brother and friend but BANG BANG BANG dozens of shots fired killing both Eduardo and Ricardo in the driveway.  Now a community is left torn at this tragedy but ready to fight back and demand change in the Sheriff’s Department.

Both Ricardo and Eduardo were put in handcuffs after they had already died and were left in the street for 9 hours until the coroner came to take their bodies.

Both Ricardo and Eduardo were put in handcuffs after they had already died and were left in the street for 9 hours until the coroner came to take their bodies.

Tonight more than 50 community members marched with the family demanding change.  In addition, the families connected the Michael Brown Ferguson murder to their own struggle and challenged the LASD to stop racial profiling and killing of black and brown people.  Very powerful moment tonight. ¡Si, se puede!

Statement on Non-Indictment of Darren Wilson

My condelences to the parents and family of Mike Brown.

My name is Patrisse Cullors and I am the director of Dignity and Power Now and co founder of Black Lives Matter. This decision to not indict Darren Wilson from the grand jury in St. Louis further perpetuates the culture of anti blackness. St. Louis has set the precedent that Black people can be murdered by law enforcement and no one will hold them accountable.

This is a time for clearer and more radical demands, as well as clearer and more radical action.

The only way to end state violence is to divest from law enforecement and invest in community support, care and resilience.

Signing off from Cuba.

Statement on Non-Indictment of Darren Wilson

After over 100 days of protest and direct action in Ferguson, the grand jury has decided not to indict Darren Wilson.

In this moment I feel angry.

In this moment, I am not suprised.

The non-indictment of Darren Wilson was meant to make Black folks feel powerless. It was meant to solidify the collective trauma of Mike Brown’s murder in our bodies as a deterrant against any action that fundamentaly questions the epidemic of anti Black state violence. The next 48 hours will be a critical expression of Black folks resilience. As folks take part in actions across the country and in Los Angeles, Dignity and Power Now supports and will continue to push forward demands that foster the long term well being of Black people, including the call for end to state violence and the dismantling of law enforcement agencies that participate in the killing of any and all Black people.

Signing off from Cuba.

Photo: Fibonacci Blue

Declaración Sobre Ferguson

Mi declaración de Cuba: Gran Jurado decide no encausar al agente Darren Wilson